DRF Moment Serializer.

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[
    {
        "id": 1,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Transportation",
                "id": 1
            },
            {
                "name": "Road Conditions",
                "id": 2
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-02T23:03:37.410228Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-03T00:11:10.307037Z",
        "title": "Driving in Bad Weather",
        "slug": "Driving_in_bad_weather",
        "summary": "1. Snow and ice storms make driving extremely dangerous. \r\n2. In bad weather, avoid bridges and overpasses if possible.\r\n3. Remember, even a little rain can mix with dirt and oil that's collected on the road.",
        "detail": "Did you know slowing down isn't the only adjustment you need to make when driving in bad weather. Snow and ice storms make driving extremely dangerous. They can deposit layers of ice that isn't immediately visible to drivers. Stay off the roads if possible. If you have to drive, in addition to slowing down and keeping a greater distance than normal between you and the car in front of you, don't make any sudden moves with the steering wheel, breaks, or accelerator, unless absolutely necessary. And avoid bridges and overpasses if possible. Remember, even a little rain can mix with dirt and oil that's collected on the road, making the surface potentially slippery even in the light rain, sleet, or snow. "
    },
    {
        "id": 2,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Personal",
                "id": 11
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-02T23:19:31.022421Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-02T23:19:31.034506Z",
        "title": "Personal Protection Equipment",
        "slug": "Personal_Protection_Equipment",
        "summary": "1. Identify potential hazards you could encounter.\r\n2. Maintain all PPE so it’s safe to use at any time.\r\n3. Inspect each piece of equipment before you put it on.\r\n\r\n\r\n",
        "detail": "Did you know personal protection equipment can't take care of you if you haven't taken care of it. When it comes to Personal Protection Equipment, safety precautions begin before \u000byou put anything on. You need to do 1, 2, 3, before you put on PPE. 1) Identify   2) Maintain   3) Inspect. Identify potential hazards you could encounter. That will help determine  the kind \u000bof protective gear you need. Maintain all PPE so it’s safe to use at any time. \u000bAnd inspect each piece of equipment before you put it on. Never assume it’s ready \u000bto be used. Being sure is the best way to be safe."
    },
    {
        "id": 3,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Physical",
                "id": 12
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-02T23:22:22.973146Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-02T23:22:22.985533Z",
        "title": "Heavy Lifting",
        "slug": "Heavy_Lifting",
        "summary": "1. For critical lifts, create a lifting plan. \r\n2. Inspect all lifting equipment.\r\n3. Know the exact weight of the lift and capacity of the equipment.",
        "detail": "Did you know heavy lifting requires brains as wells as brawn? Plan the lift and follow a Job Safety Analysis (JSA) making everyone around the lift area aware of the activity. For critical lifts, create a lifting plan. Inspect all lifting equipment. Know the exact weight of the lift and capacity of the equipment. Follow lifting procedures precisely. Never walk or stand under a load that’s being lifted. And if you have any doubts about safety, stop work until those doubts are resolved.\r\n\r\n"
    },
    {
        "id": 4,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Occupational",
                "id": 10
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-02T23:34:46.204991Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-02T23:34:46.216088Z",
        "title": "Falling",
        "slug": "Falling",
        "summary": "1. Precautions should be taken to minimize the risk of falling\r\n2. Make sure the ground is stable and a perimeter is marked.\r\n3. If possible, use scissor or boom lifts to access the heightened workspace to avoid climbing ladders.\r\n",
        "detail": "Did you know your risk of falling goes down when proper equipment goes up? You don’t have to fall far to fall hard. When working at any height, precautions should be taken to minimize the risk of falling. If possible, use scissor or boom lifts to access the heightened workspace to avoid climbing ladders. Make sure the ground is stable and a perimeter is marked. Where necessary, wear a full-body harness and shock-absorbing lanyard tied off to an appropriate anchor point to keep the distance of a fall at a minimum and worker safety at a maximum."
    },
    {
        "id": 5,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Occupational",
                "id": 10
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-02T23:38:52.240248Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-02T23:38:52.254527Z",
        "title": "Hand Tools",
        "slug": "Hand_Tools",
        "summary": "1. Uninspected hand tools can lead to unwanted consequences.\r\n2. Worn tool housings can result in shock or electrocution.\r\n3. Mushroomed heads of tools can shatter upon impact. ",
        "detail": "Did you know uninspected hand tools can lead to unwanted consequences. Hand tools can’t take care of themselves. It’s the user’s responsibility to make sure they are properly maintained in good working order. Improper maintenance, or the total lack of it, can lead to malfunctions that result in injuries. Cracked wooden handles might allow the tool head to fly off. Mushroomed heads can shatter upon impact. Worn tool housings can result in shock or electrocution. Always inspect hand tools before using them, and maintain them so when you’re ready to work hard, they’re ready to work properly. \r\n"
    },
    {
        "id": 6,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Occupational",
                "id": 10
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-02T23:41:20.150234Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-02T23:41:20.203888Z",
        "title": "Dropped Objects",
        "slug": "Dropped_Objects",
        "summary": "1. Objects falling on people lead to serious injuries.\r\n2. We can all decrease falling object incidents by increasing falling object awareness. \r\n3. Establish restricted areas and post signs under work at height. ",
        "detail": "Did you know when objects go down unexpectedly, injuries go up exponentially? In fact, objects falling on people, (often from heights) do lead to serious injuries. We can all decrease falling object incidents by increasing falling object awareness. Institute procedures for inspecting equipment and fixtures, and securing tools and loose objects. Establish restricted areas and post signs under work at height. Institute Stop Work Authority if there’s any doubt about safety. Eliminating injuries from dropped objects should always be a high priority.\r\n"
    },
    {
        "id": 7,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Personal",
                "id": 11
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-02T23:50:58.885283Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-02T23:50:58.897947Z",
        "title": "Confined Spaces",
        "slug": "Confined_Spaces",
        "summary": "1. In a confined space, make arrangements to get out before you get in.\r\n2. Have rescue plans and emergency procedures in place \u000bin advance.",
        "detail": "Did you know you should never enter a confined space without an exit plan in place. You’re not really safe in a confined space if you haven’t made arrangements to get out before you get in. It’s not enough to simply identify potential hazards you might encounter when working in confined spaces such as vessels, tanks, etc. It is vital to have rescue plans and emergency procedures in place \u000bin advance. Communications, extraction equipment, shutdown capabilities, first-aid, and rapid availability of skilled emergency service personnel, should all be at hand before you set foot in a confined space.\r\n"
    },
    {
        "id": 8,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Chemical",
                "id": 4
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-02T23:55:53.586663Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-02T23:55:53.596961Z",
        "title": "Chemical Safety",
        "slug": "Chemical_Safety",
        "summary": "1. Never handle or store chemicals without understanding potential hazards associated with them.\r\n2. Read and follow the directions on the safety data sheets (SDS). \r\n3. Don’t mix chemicals if you’re not positive of their compatibility.",
        "detail": "Did you know the key elements in the chemical safety formula are knowledge and caution. From the field, to the lab, to the plant and beyond, chemicals abound in oil and gas related industries. Working with them safely requires proper controls, equipment, and behavior. Never handle or store chemicals without understanding potential hazards associated with them by reading and following the directions on the safety data sheets (SDS). Always use Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) when working with chemicals as prescribed by the SDS. Don’t mix chemicals if you’re not positive of their compatibility. If any doubt exists, stop work and get clarification before you act.\r\n"
    },
    {
        "id": 9,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Occupational",
                "id": 10
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-03T00:01:21.285378Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-03T00:01:21.295766Z",
        "title": "Lifting and Hoisting",
        "slug": "Lifting_and_Hoisting",
        "summary": "1. Properly understand the true capabilities of your forklift or crane.\r\n2. Perform a JSA (Job Safety Analysis) in order to ensure proper mechanical lifts or hoists.\r\n3. Then be sure equipment is properly seated and secured.",
        "detail": "Did you know, if ignored, the laws of physics will take control of your crane or forklift. Failing to properly understand the true capabilities of your forklift or crane can easily lead to disaster. To help ensure proper mechanical lifts or hoists, perform a JSA (Job Safety Analysis), inspect the forklift or crane, and check the equipment’s certification. Then be sure equipment is properly seated and secured. Follow all hoisting procedures and always know the load’s weight and length (the further out the load, the more weight is added to the lift). Be certain only certified employees operate equipment. And no one should ever be under a lift in progress. \r\n"
    },
    {
        "id": 10,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Occupational",
                "id": 10
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-03T00:05:33.093921Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-03T00:05:33.103633Z",
        "title": "Hand Tools",
        "slug": "Hand_Tools1",
        "summary": "1. Improper use and maintenance of hand tools is a major source of injury and death.\r\n2. Prevent shock or electrocution by inspecting power cords for wear and tool housing for cracks.\r\n3. Improper tool modification is particularly dangerous.",
        "detail": "Did you know, neglecting your hand tools can cut short a career? In the workplace, improper use and maintenance of hand tools is a major source of injury—and death. Safe use starts with ensuring tools are right for the job and in good working condition. Prevent shock or electrocution by inspecting power cords for wear and tool housing for cracks. Workers must be properly trained, use the right personal protection gear, and never wear loose clothing or jewelry near rotating or moving parts. Improper tool modification is particularly dangerous. For example, don’t remove the safety guards on a two-handed grinder. Grinder wheels frequently fly off, and the results can be gruesome.\r\n"
    },
    {
        "id": 11,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Occupational",
                "id": 10
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-03T00:07:35.523336Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-03T00:07:35.532580Z",
        "title": "Dropped Objects",
        "slug": "Dropped_Objects1",
        "summary": "1. All lifting equipment should be certified, inspected and properly operated.\r\n2. Workers should be fully harnessed when working at height\r\n3. It’s critical that all elevated tools, parts and materials always be secured.",
        "detail": "Did you know, what goes up doesn't have to come down - on someone's head? At the job site, there’s no excuse for dropped objects. To start with, all lifting equipment should be certified, inspected and properly operated to help ensure dropped object incidents don’t occur. Workers should be fully harnessed when working at height (six feet or more by U.S. standards). It’s critical that all elevated tools, parts and materials always be secured. In addition, once the job is finished, workers should double check to make certain no loose objects are left behind. And last but not least,a restricted area should always be established beneath suspended objects or work being done at height. \r\n"
    },
    {
        "id": 12,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Occupational",
                "id": 10
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-03T00:10:21.624480Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-03T00:10:21.635530Z",
        "title": "Heights",
        "slug": "Heights",
        "summary": "1. Managing a worker’s risk of falling is a critical job safety practice. \r\n2. Most critical is requiring workers to wear a full-body harness.\r\n3. Scaffolding, ladders and temporary flooring should be examined for load strength and proper positioning.",
        "detail": "Did you know working at heights elevates the risk of serious injury. Managing a worker’s risk of falling is a critical—yet often overlooked—job safety practice. Commonly defined as “working at height” (4 feet or more by U.S. standards), performing tasks above ground or floor level should require a hazard assessment prior to the task being started. Most critical is requiring workers to wear a full-body harness. This precaution alone has saved countless lives. In addition, scaffolding, ladders and temporary flooring should be examined for load strength and proper positioning. And to protect those working or walking below any elevated work, hand tools and materials should be secured at all time.\r\n"
    },
    {
        "id": 13,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Occupational",
                "id": 10
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-03T00:18:41.425826Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-03T00:18:41.435545Z",
        "title": "Work Permit",
        "slug": "Work_Permit",
        "summary": "1. Permitting some high risk work with no permit is risky business.\r\n2. Before starting any non-routine, high-risk work, it’s always wise to perform a risk assessment.\r\n3. Then use controls to eliminate or mitigate identified risks.",
        "detail": "Did you know, permitting some high risk work with no permit is risky business. For non-routine high-risk activities such as grinding and welding, or working in confined spaces that pose chemical or atmospheric hazards, a facility-issued permit to work is a “must have.” Before starting any non-routine, high-risk work, it’s always wise to perform a risk assessment and then use controls to eliminate or mitigate identified risks. Only then—and with a valid permit to work approved and signed—should workers begin. And of course, if those assigned to the task don’t fully understand the permit to work guidelines and parameters, questions should be dealt with immediately.\r\n"
    },
    {
        "id": 14,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Transportation",
                "id": 1
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-03T00:22:10.067731Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-03T00:22:10.086560Z",
        "title": "Secure Your Loads",
        "slug": "Secure_Your_Loads",
        "summary": "1. Properly contain, immobilize, and secure truck cargo.\r\n2. Check and double check cargo weight, height, and width; tie-down ratings, numbers, and applications.\r\n3. Prevent cargo from leaking, spilling, blowing, or falling from the vehicle.",
        "detail": "Did you know failing to secure loads can cause loads of trouble? When it comes to properly containing, immobilizing, and securing truck cargo, failing to consider a number of factors can lead to serious injury or loss of license—not to mention costly fines for your company. Things to check—and double check—include: cargo weight, height, and width; tie-down ratings, numbers, and applications; anchor points; blocking and bracing; tarps and covers; cargo bed debris and tool removal; pre-inspection; and “after starting” recheck inspections. All must be considered and addressed to prevent cargo from leaking, spilling, blowing, or falling from the vehicle. \r\n"
    },
    {
        "id": 15,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Occupational",
                "id": 10
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-03T01:23:16.097684Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-03T01:23:16.138034Z",
        "title": "Pressure Awareness",
        "slug": "Pressure_Awareness",
        "summary": "1. There are simply far too \u000bmany pressure activities to cover.\r\n2. Assume that every step of a pressure activity is a potential pressure hazard.\r\n3. If pressure must be released, use a choke and release \u000bit slowly.",
        "detail": "Did you know pressure safety starts with awareness of potential pressure hazards? Pressure operations is ever-present in the oil and gas industry, \u000bfrom formation testing to well testing and pressure testing of equipment and wellbores. The fact is there are simply far too \u000bmany pressure activities to cover. The wise thing to do is to assume that every step of a pressure activity is a potential pressure hazard. If gauges are available, \u000buse and monitor them. Always use your PPE and training provided to you by your \u000bemployer. If pressure must be released, use a choke and release \u000bit slowly. Anytime pressure is involved, and if you’re not sure \u000bwhat to do, or how to do it, then STOP WORK and perform a \u000bJob Safety Analysis.\r\n"
    },
    {
        "id": 16,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Transportation",
                "id": 1
            },
            {
                "name": "Road Conditions",
                "id": 2
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-03T01:35:32.811044Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-03T01:35:32.854255Z",
        "title": "Distracted Driving",
        "slug": "Distracted_Driving",
        "summary": "1. Behind the wheel, nothing is more important than focus.\r\n2. The only thing you should be doing when you’re driving is driving.\r\n3. Every day people are killed and injured simply because a driver is distracted. Don’t be one of them.",
        "detail": "Did you know the only thing you should be doing when you’re driving is driving? Behind the wheel, nothing is more important than focus. A laser focus on what’s ahead, around and behind your vehicle. Stay aware of road and weather conditions, traffic, pedestrians, your speed, and your need to be in complete control of your vehicle.\r\nDo not take a call, make a call, text, apply makeup, eat, let your eyes or mind wander to other people in your car, or do anything other than focus on your driving. If any of the above things must be done, pull safely off the road and out of the traffic flow to do them. Every day people are killed and injured simply because a driver is distracted. Don’t be one of them.\r\n"
    },
    {
        "id": 17,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Fire",
                "id": 6
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-03T01:40:07.690291Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-03T01:40:07.710184Z",
        "title": "Know Your Exits",
        "slug": "Know_Your_Exits",
        "summary": "1. Sometimes safety is about quickly getting away from an unsafe situation.\r\n2. Get in the habit of always locating the emergency exit wherever you are.\r\n3. If you know exactly where to go, \u000byou’ll get there a lot quicker.",
        "detail": "Did you know the best way in is not always the best way out. Sometimes safety is about quickly getting away from an unsafe situation. That’s why it pays to know your exits. Chances are you’re aware of the exits from your home or your workplace. But what about the stores where you shop, the public buildings you enter, the venues you take your family to, or the hotels where you stay? Get in the habit of always locating the emergency exit wherever you are. If you know exactly where to go, \u000byou’ll get there a lot quicker.\r\n"
    },
    {
        "id": 18,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Physical",
                "id": 12
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-03T02:00:22.365165Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-03T02:00:22.378814Z",
        "title": "Ladder Safety",
        "slug": "Ladder_Safety",
        "summary": "1. There’s a lot more to ladder safety than safely climbing it. \r\n2. Ladders aren’t properly secured either at the top or the bottom.\r\n3. No matter how convenient it might seem, don’t try to \u000bcarry tools and materials up or down the ladder.",
        "detail": "Did you know there’s a lot more to ladder safety than safely climbing it? Hands on the rungs, or hands gripping the side rails, are both okay, as long as you use both hands. But ladder safety doesn’t stop there. Frequently, ladders aren’t properly secured either at the top or the bottom. Ladders should be long enough to extend at least 3 feet above the landing. And they should be tied off. They should also be set at a proper angle. A 1 to 4 pitch is recommended. One foot out for each four feet of height. And no matter how convenient it might seem, don’t try to \u000bcarry tools and materials up or down the ladder. Use a \u000bhand line to haul them up or down.\r\n"
    },
    {
        "id": 19,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Weather",
                "id": 14
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-03T02:10:06.416947Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-03T02:10:06.426481Z",
        "title": "Heat",
        "slug": "Heat",
        "summary": "1. When you sweat, perspiration evaporates and actually helps cool the body. \r\n2. That humidity can actually reduce the degree to which the body can lose heat by evaporation.\r\n3. Wear a proper hat to keep the sun off your head and neck.",
        "detail": "Did you know ‘it’s not the heat, it’s the Humidity’, is more than a cliché, it’s a danger signal. It’s true that when you sweat, perspiration evaporates and actually helps cool the body. But if you’re working in an environment that’s both hot and humid, that humidity can actually reduce the degree to which the body can lose heat by evaporation. The harder it is \u000bto cool off, the easier it is to suffer a heat related illness. Wearing light, loose-fitting clothes, such as cotton and light colors, can help. But it’s best to keep the basics in mind, too, like wearing a proper hat to keep the sun off your head and neck. Drink lots of water to stay hydrated. And if you’re doing strenuous work, take breaks often to cool down.\r\n"
    },
    {
        "id": 20,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Personal",
                "id": 11
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-03T02:20:10.811163Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-03T02:20:10.820999Z",
        "title": "Malaria",
        "slug": "Malaria",
        "summary": "1. Malaria is a disease caused by a parasite passed from one human to another by the bite of infected mosquitoes.\r\n2. If you’re traveling to an area where malaria is a factor, take preventive medications.\r\n3. Avoid mosquito bites by wearing protective clothing over arms and legs, using screens on windows, as well as applying insect repellent.",
        "detail": "Did you know, you need to go on offense to defend against malaria? Malaria is a disease caused by a parasite passed from one human to another by the bite of infected mosquitoes. It’s dangerous. Sometimes deadly. If you’re traveling to an area where malaria is a factor, take preventive medications. Depending on the type of medication prescribed, you may need to begin taking it anywhere from one day to two weeks prior to departure. But prevention doesn’t end there. While “in country”, you should try to avoid mosquito bites by wearing protective clothing over arms and legs, using screens on windows, as well as applying insect repellent. You may even need to continue medications for a month or so after your trip. Check with your physician to be sure. Better safe, than sorry.\r\n"
    },
    {
        "id": 21,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Transportation",
                "id": 1
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {},
        "created": "2015-05-03T02:22:06.317362Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-03T02:22:06.325829Z",
        "title": "Driver Fatigue",
        "slug": "Driver_Fatigue",
        "summary": "1. Fatigue can sometimes induce a mental state in which drivers imagine certain conditions exist when they really don’t.\r\n2. Never use drugs \u000bor alcohol when driving.\r\n3. Traffic accidents increase dramatically after approximately 7 hours of driving.",
        "detail": "Did you know, you might be asleep at the wheel with eyes wide open? Fatigue can be fatal. Especially when you’re driving. And one problem is, you might not even know it. Fatigue can sometimes induce a mental state in which drivers imagine certain conditions exist when they really don’t. Sudden reactions to those imaginary conditions can result in very real disasters. To help avoid fatigue behind the wheel, never use drugs \u000bor alcohol when driving.\r\nPull well off the road and rest if you feel fatigue coming on. Make frequent stops on extended trips. Traffic accidents increase dramatically after approximately 7 hours of driving. Don’t push it. If you’re feeling less than 100 percent, it’s best not to drive.\r\n"
    },
    {
        "id": 22,
        "author": {
            "id": 2,
            "username": "mac"
        },
        "keywords": [
            {
                "name": "Nuclear",
                "id": 9
            }
        ],
        "header_image": {
            "id": 4,
            "image": "https://sm-050215.s3.amazonaws.com/drone_safety_small.jpg?Signature=A4l80feRIx3nk5UqrDITpqaZ7eM%3D&Expires=1571294584&AWSAccessKeyId=AKIAIXSAHIO6O5N4YVUQ",
            "spec": "original",
            "original": null
        },
        "created": "2015-05-03T21:08:22.467186Z",
        "modified": "2015-05-03T22:12:12.226397Z",
        "title": "Indoor Drone Safety",
        "slug": "Indoor_Drone_Safety",
        "summary": "1. Flying drones indoors is not recommended. \r\n2. Augmented reality technologies enabling flying drones can lead to finger loss.\r\n3. Pacquiao didn't read a Safety Moment. Mayweather did. \r\n4. No drones. ",
        "detail": "Did you know that flying drones indoors can lead to dead babies, loss of fingers, or even shattered mirrors *shattered dreams*? It is important to consult a therapist each and every time a flying drone is considered to be capable of flying indoors. After consuming Total Zero Red Bulls, flying drones should definitely not be trusted indoors. Establish restricted areas for drone flight like: (1) outside, (2) in a grassy area not inside, or (3) outside of a building (outside) in order to ensure safety adherence. Eliminating injuries from flying drones should always be a top priority."
    }
]
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